Monday, October 31, 2016

How to Make a Bottle Brush Stamp - Part 2 of 2 - Did it Work?

This is a Bottlebrush stamp that is ready to be used
Fig.1 Ready
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supplies:
Acrylic paint
Craft paint
Poster paint

The Bottlebrush (Callistemon) plant was chosen because the end of the plant somewhat resembles a brush. Several varieties of plants and trees were tried and all failed by losing their leaves on the canvas. This post shows that this plant shows some promise for making a paint pattern.

This post shows the four steps if this Bottlebrush stamp can be used in your artwork and kept in your studio.


Step 1: Fig.1 and fig.2 shows the Bottlebrush plant ready to be used.
All the stamp needs is paint
Fig.2 Add paint
Step 2: Fig.3 and fig.4 shows that adding paint to the end of the Bottlebrush plants makes interesting marks on the paper.

This Bottlebrush stamp can be used to scratch the paint
Fig.3 Laying on  
the canvas
Notice the green paint and this is the product of the Bottlebrush stamp
Fig.4 Patters from the 
Bottlebrush stamp
Step 3: Fig.5 and fig.6 shows the paint stamps on the paper canvas. This Bottlebrush stamp was fun to see if it would work but it should not be in your studio. As soon as the Bottlebrush leaves were dried the leaves started to fall on the canvas.

The brush will spread the paint on the canvas
Fig.5 Scratches paint on canvas
Here the Bottlebrush stamp mixed the paint to create its effect.
Fig.6 Another example of stamping
Step 4: Fig.7 shows the stamp after being rinsed. The Bottlebrush stamp is falling apart and this shows that this brush is a one time use. This stamp should not be used in your artwork, specially if your using oil paint. Bits and pieces of the leaves when dry will gladly fall into the paint, but on the other hand this could be called mixed media. Then this stamp would work well for this type of painting. Fig.8 shows the dried up Bottlebrush stamp. Peel of the vinyl tape at the top and unravel the green plant wire and use it for your next stamp. The tree branches can be reused but the Bottlebrush plant will need to be disposed into the plant bin.
The Bottlebrush stamps once the paint was removed was finished and needed to be taken appart
Fig.7 After washing
If used dried the Bottlebrush stamp will leave its leaves to mix with the paint
Fig.8 Dried up leaves

How to Make a Bottle Brush Pattern Brush:
   
Part 1 of 2 - Assembly
    Part 2 of 2 - Does It Work?


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Wednesday, October 26, 2016

How to Make a Bottle Brush Stamp - Part 1 of 2 - Assembly

Fig.1 Green 
Plant Wire
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supplies:
Bottlebrush plant
Plant twist tie 150-feet
Electrical vinyl tape
Tree branches

The Bottlebrush (Callistemon) plant was chosen because the end of the plant somewhat resembles a brush. Several other plant varieties were tried and all failed by losing their leaves on the canvas or falling apart when assembling the brush components except the Bottlebrush plant. This post shows this is the most inexpensive brush handle made thus far. It also requires the least amount of work to make the brush handle and the brush. 

This post shows the three steps on how to assemble a live Bottlebrush plant brush.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the plant twist tie and it is used to hold the brush handle together. Fig.2 shows standard vinyl electrical tape and this was used to hold the handle and the Bottlebrush plant together. Fig.3 shows that several plants were used but in the end the Bottlebrush plant was chosen for this post. Fig.4 shows the tip of the Bottlebrush plant and notice how it is shaped like a brush tip.
Fig.2 Electrical tape
Fig.3 Some plants work 
some plants do not
Fig.4 Bottle Brush tip
Step 2: Fig.5 through fig.7 shows the progression of assembling the Bottlebrush brush. Fig.5 shows the Bottlebrush stem is surrounded by other tree stems and held together by plant twist ties. Fig.6 shows that plant twist tie can be wrapped tightly or wrapped and spread apart on the stem. This is up to the maker. Either way it works to keep the plant stems together. Fig.7 shows the bottom was twisted a few times to keep it from unraveling. The top of the Bottlebrush has two inches of vinyl tape to cover the end of the wire tie to protect the fingers.
Fig.5 Bottle Brush assembled
Fig.6 Green plant wire
Fig.7 The sticks
Step 3: Fig.8 shows this is the Bottlebrush plant brush. In the next post this brush will  be tested to see if this is a practical choice to use to paint on paper canvas. The plant twist tie can be reused on other project after this brush looses its effect.
Fig.8 Finished
How to Make a Bottle Brush Stamp:

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Tuesday, October 25, 2016

How to Make a Pine Needle Brush - Part 2 of 2 - Does It Work?

Fig.1
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supplies:
Art paper
Acrylic paint
Pine needle brush (Made earlier)

The first post showed how the Pine Needle Brush was assembled. This post will show how the pine needle worked on watercolor paper and if this is a brush that can land in your studio.

This post shows the five steps whether this pine brush is fit for an art studio.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows Strathmore Water Color Paper used in these examples and fig.2 shows the paper is ready to be used. Fig.3 shows Liquitex Basic Aquamarine will be used to highlight the each examples.
Fig.2 Blank paper
Fig.3 Liquitex Basics
Aquamarine
Step 2: Fig.4 through fig.6 shows the paints used in these example: FolkArt Metallic Artist Quality Craft Red paint, Liquitex Artist Color Bright AQua Green and Ultra Gloss Acrylic Enamel 
Cadmium Yellow. These are the colors used in this example.
Fig.4 FolkArt 
Metallic Artist 
Quality Craft 
Red paint
Fig.5 Liquitex Bright 
AQua Green
Fig.6 Ultra Gloss 
Acrylic Enamel 
Cadmium Yellow
Step 3: Fig.7 shows the pine needle brush and fig.8 shows the pine brush on the top of the watercolor paper. The brush doesn't really paint what is does is sweep the paint across the paper. The brush has little control, and this brush could never do fine detail work, its like working with a broom.

Fig.7 Pine needle brush
Fig.8 First pass
Step 4: Fig.9 and fig.10 shows more passes from pine tree brush. This is not a worthy brush to add to a studio. It might work on a large canvas but not on little ones.

Fig.9 Second pass
Fig.10 Last pass

Step 5: Fig.11 and fig.12 shows the final reason why pine tree brushes are not used in the industry. They fall apart when washed in the sink. They fall apart when paint is added to the brush and the debris sheds all over the paper canvas. This job was a failure, but the adventure was worth it. Just because they are plenty of materials for a brush does not mean that it can be used artistically. The next set will be about How to Make a Bottle Brush. The difference is this post is that this brush is a live plant the other are not.
Fig.11 Uneven 
pine needles
Fig.12 Falling 
pine needles
How to Make a Pine Needle Brush:

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How to Make a Pine Needle Brush - Part 1 of 2 - Assembly

Fig.1 Plant Wire
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supplies:
Acid brush
Electrical tape
Fish line 60 lb.
Plant green tape
Plant green wire
Wood glue

We have many pine trees in our neighborhood. It seemed that pine needles could be used as paint brushes. All these pine needles are just for the taking and could make some fine brushes. This post address the assembly of a simple pine brush. In part-2 this post will address if the pine needle brush is a worthwhile brush for your studio.

This post shows the four steps for assembling a pine needle brush.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the green plant wire that will be used to wrapped around the pine needles together. Fig.2 shows the wood glue used to keep the pine needles in place. Wood glue and green plant wire was used in combination to keep the needles in place.
Fig.2 Wood glue with brush
Note: Wood glue and green plant wire was used in combination to keep the needles in place.

Step 2: Fig.3 through fig.5 shows the Birch wood handles available for these brushes. Fig.3 and fig.4 shows Birch wood handles. Fig.5 shows the pine needles and some leaf branches that will be used in the brush. Please note that Birch trees were used because it is readily available in our neighborhood.
Fig.3 Birch wood handles
Fig.4 Birch handle
Fig.5 Pine needles 
and wood branch
Step 3: Fig.6
through fig.8 shows the progression of assembling the pine needles to the Birch wood handle. Fig.6 shows the first strand that will be wrapped with green metal wire holding down the end of the pine needles. Fig.7 shows a half inch of wrapped wire holding down the pine needles and fig.8 shows over an inch was used to hold down the pine needles. Wood glue and green metal tape was also used to hold the pine needles together.

Note: A handle is not a priority, but it helps hold the needles in place.
Fig.6 Green plant wire
Fig.7 Over an inch
Fig.8 Trim the needles
Step 4: Fig.9 and fig.10 shows how to tighten the pine needles brush tips. The arrow points to the area were the brush needed to be pulled in to make it usable.
Fig.9 Wire is better
Fig.10 Ready to paint
Tip: It would be better to use a metal flexible wire for the ends instead of electrical tape. The tape falls off when used across the paper canvas.


How to Make a Pine Needle Brush:

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Sunday, October 23, 2016

How to Make a Bird of Paradise Art Brush - Part 1 of 2 - Assembly

Fig.1 Supplies
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supply:
Birds of Paradise dried flower (free)
Matches
Rubber bands (2) free
String (parcel)
White nylon rope
Wood branches (free)
Wood glue

This post shows how to make a paint brush from scratch using material that are all around you. The handle of this brush is part of tree branch which was free and a curved handle was chosen to make it different than standards straight brushes. The brush itself is from a Bird Of Paradise dried flower. The flowers are at first held by two rubber bands in the beginning and later replaced with parcel string. The handle has a layer of thicker twine to give it more comfort and control. This post has two parts the first shows how the brush was made. The second show does the brush work, how it works with paint and does it work well enough for your art studio. This brush will not have the same life as a store bought brush because it is made of totally nature made materials.

This post shows the five steps of making an Bird of Paradise Art Brush. 

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the tree leaves sticks and bird of paradise flowers. The arrow point to the tree branches used in the handle of these brushes. Fig.2 shows the parts of the brush that have not been put together yet. Fig.3 shows the arrow points to the rubber bands that held the flowers in place until  the twine was wrapped around the flowers and the wood branch handle. Fig.3 and fig.4 shows the first step is to take the flowers together and make a bunch to add them to the wooden branch. Fig.5 shows the second rubber band was used to apply pressure to the end of the dried flowers.
Fig.2 Weeds
Fig.3 First rubber band
Fig.4 Place the 
flowers on the end

Fig.5 Second 
rubber band
Step 2: Fig.6 shows that once the flower are held in place by the parcel string a wood glue painted on the twine. Fig.7 shows the wood glue placed in a small bottle. 
Fig.6 String
Fig.7 Wood glue
Step 3:  Fig.8 shows that a larger nylon rope is being added to the curved wood branch handle. Fig.9 shows another layer of wood glue was added to the brush handle.
Fig.8 Rope handle
Fig.9 Glue to handle
Step 4:  Fig.10 and fig.11 shows that a second layer of glue was added to the brush handle. the front and back of the decorated magazine holder. Fig.11 shows that the bottom end of the rope was tied and tucked in to prevent unraveling. 
Fig.10 Finishing 
the handle
Fig.11 Tucking
the ends



Step 5:  Fig.12 shows that the ends of the nylon rope needs to be melted. At the beginning and at the end of the twisted twine there are two ends that needed to be sealed. Melting the loose leads of the nylon twine by using flames from matches will prevent the plastic rope from coming intertwined.
Fig.12 Matches
 The second part of this post will show how this bird of paradise brush
Fig.13 Flower brush
How to Make a Bird of Paradise Art Brush


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